September 24, 2014

September 24, 2014 - meeting

“Price's Lost Campaign:
The 1864 Invasion of Missouri
(Shades of Blue & Gray)"
by Dr. Mark A. Lause.

Dr. Mark A. Lause, is Professor of History at the University of Cincinnati and is the author of numerous other books.


Lause’s account of the Missouri Campaign of 1864 brings new understanding of the two distinct phases of the campaign, as based upon declared strategic goals. Additionally, as the author reveals the clear connection between the military campaign and the outcome of the election, he successfully tests the efforts of new military historians to integrate political, economic, social, and cultural history into the study of warfare. In showing how both sides during Sterling’s Raid used self-serving fictions to provide a rationale for their politically motivated brutality and were unwilling to risk defeat, Lause reveals the underlying nature of the American Civil War as a modern war.


http://www.amazon.com/Prices-Lost-Campaign-Invasion-Missouri/dp/0826219497

In the fall of 1864, during the last brutal months of the Civil War, the Confederates made one final, desperate attempt to rampage through the Shenandoah Valley, Tennessee, and Missouri. Price’s Raid, the common name for the Missouri Campaign led by General Sterling Price, was the last of these attempts. Involving tens of thousands of armed men, the 1864 Missouri Campaign has too long remained unexamined by a book-length modern study but now,  Civil War scholar Mark A. Lause fills this long-standing gap in the literature, providing keen insights on the problems encountered during and the myths propagated about this campaign.


General Sterling Price marched Confederate troops 1,500 miles into Missouri, five times as far as his Union counterparts who met him in the incursion. Along the way, he picked up additional troops; the most exaggerated estimates place Price’s troop numbers at 15,000. The Federal forces initially underestimated the numbers heading for Missouri and then called in troops from Illinois and Kansas, amassing 65,000 to 75,000 troops and militia members. The Union tried to downplay its underestimation of the Confederate build-up of troops by supplanting the term "campaign" with the impromptu "raid." This term was also used by Confederates to minimize their lack of military success. The Confederates, believing that Missourians wanted liberation from Union forces, had planned a two-phase campaign. They intended not only to disrupt the functioning government through seizure of St. Louis and the capitol Jefferson City but also to restore the pro-secessionist government driven from the state three years before. The primary objective, however, was to change the outcome of the Federal elections that fall, encouraging votes against the Republicans who incorporated ending slavery into the Union war goals. What followed was widespread uncontrolled brutality in the form of guerrilla warfare, which drove support for the Federalists. Missouri joined Kansas in reelecting the Republicans and ensuring the end of slavery.


“Price's Lost Campaign:
The 1864 Invasion of Missouri
(Shades of Blue & Gray)"
by Dr. Mark A. Lause.


This book is available at http://www.amazon.com/Prices-Lost-Campaign-Invasion-Missouri/dp/0826219497


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Mark Lause background as found at  (click here)


Lause has done extensive work in nineteenth century labor and social history, including numerous articles in academic journals and reference material.  His initial work focused on early printers to discuss the origins of an American labor movement: “Some Degree of Power”: From Hired Hand to Union Craftsman in the Preindustrial American Printing Trades, 1778-1815. (Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press, 1991) documented the first generation of unionists in that craft.

Lause’s subsequent work has sought new ways of examining and understanding the sectional crisis and the Civil War "from the bottom up."  He argued for the complexity of the Republican and Unionist coalition—before and after—in Young America: Land, Labor, and the Republican Community (Urbana IL: University of Illinois Press, 2005) on the antebellum land reform movement and The Civil War's Last Campaign: James B. Weaver, the Greenback-Labor Party & the Politics of Race & Section (Lanpham, Md.: University Press of America, 2001). His Race & Radicalism in the Union Army (Urbana IL: University of Illinois Press, 2009) explores the wartime collaboration of blacks, Indians and whites in the Transmississippi under the leadership of those abolitionists, land reformers, socialists and others who had been associated with John Brown before the Civil War. The Antebellum Political Crisis & the First American Bohemians (Kent, OH:  Kent State University Press, 2009) discusses the cultural impact of escalating sectional and electoral pressures on antebellum radicalism.  His Price's Lost Campaign: the 1864 Invasion of Missouri (Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2011) uses social and institutional history to cast light on the neglected Civil War expedition that largely closed the conflict west of the Mississippi River.  A Secret Society History of the Civil War (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2011) examines the importance of several clandestine, fraternal traditions as a means of understanding how ordinary citizens, including African Americans, struggled to shape their history.

In addition, Lause is completing a monograph on the politics of mid-nineteenth century American spiritualism and finishing a major work on the labor movement during the Civil War, as well as composing a second book on the close of 1864 Missouri campaign.  Afterwards, he aspires to pursue several projects in nineteenth century European and comparative fields. 
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We meet at:
ROYALE ORLEANS BANQUET CENTER

2801 South Telegraph Road
Mehlville (St Louis), MO 63125

Doors open at 5:30

Meal served at 6:30

Presentation at 7:30
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Please note: as of August 7 2014, MapQuest will not longer allow us to show Mehlville as the town but now uses St. Louis.

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